NEWS

Conducted by global digital communications consultancy Comprend, the annual Webranking Report is based on evaluating stakeholder demand and pinpointing how companies can improve communications strategies and output.

Describing themselves as ‘the smart way to stay ahead,’ the Sunday Times Scotland and the Times Scotland are the official media partners for the 72nd Edinburgh International Film Festival (EIFF).

NEWS FILTERS

Conducted by global digital communications consultancy Comprend, the annual Webranking Report is based on evaluating stakeholder demand and pinpointing how companies can improve communications strategies and output.
In March 2017, amid the plants and vines of the London Barbican’s famous greenhouse, the fourth annual Suzy Ferguson Spirit Award took place. Honouring unsung heroes in the public relations world, last year’s Suzy Spirit Award saw the profession step back and appreciate the industry’s rising stars. Continuing this focus on those dedicated to furthering the profession, the shortlist for the Suzy Spirit Award 2018 has been announced.
For some companies, ‘innovation’ is nothing more than a buzzword lent credence by marketing and PR campaigns, or used as a synonym for change. For the north of Scotland, however, the word has meaning – it represents the significant strides being made to empower entrepreneurs in the Highlands and Islands business community.
The 30% Club was founded in 2010 by then-CEO of Newton Investment Management and current head of personal investing at Legal & General, Dame Helena Morrissey. Managed by social enterprise Women Ahead, its voluntary, business-led approach uses mentors to empower women to get ahead in sport and business.
In general, over the past year, positive reputation among business and charities has risen. Frustrated by seemingly arbitrary governmental intervention in industry innovation, the public is turning to business to address issues it is felt are ignored by other widescale stakeholders. But when influence is used for exploitation, and power undermines the foundations that drive organisational progress, a reputational crisis ensues.
The past few years has seen a step-change in both the content and the dissemination of communication. Seismic shifts in the global political landscape, such as Brexit and widespread support of outsider political figures such as Donald Trump and Jeremy Corbyn, has seen an accompanying rift between traditional news outlets and, as one presidential aide put it, ‘alternative facts.’ Yet, with the industry’s integrity at stake, implications for the journalism and public relations industries extend beyond occasional misreporting.
In September 2014, the Transparency of Lobbying, Non-Party Campaigning and Trade Union Administration Act 2014, widely known as the Lobbying Act, was launched. Placing boundaries on public-facing campaigns led by charities, organisations, not-for-profits and non-governmental organisations (NGOs) during or in the run-up to local, regional or national elections, the act is widely considered to negatively impact both the charity sector’s work, and the communications around it.
Last week in Davos, Switzerland, US-based business and financial news network CNBC and British automotive brand McLaren announced a new multiyear corporate partnership, effective from 2018. Building on each of their impressive reputations and global audiences, executives see the relationship as having the potential to stir investment and interest across both companies.
Last week, the Public Relations and Communications Association (PRCA) hosted its ‘2018: The Year Of’ event at Smith Square, in the heart of London. Discussing and analysing the 18 trends PR and communications professionals feel will resonate most with the industry over 2018, the morning’s conference investigated the future – while referring to valuable lessons from the past.